Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMuñoz Gallarte, Israel
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-18T09:12:02Z
dc.date.available2016-05-18T09:12:02Z
dc.date.issued2016-05-18
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10396/13564
dc.description.abstractIn approaching this issue, it will be helpful to use two analytically distinct methods, to wit, the diachronic, which allows us to speculate about how the myth reached the hands of Lydgate (Guerin 2005, 183–191); and the synchronic, to clarify the similarities and differences between the two authors. Thus, approaching the subject diachronically, the first pages of this paper will attempt to delineate the main milestones in the long tradition of the myth of Oedipus, beginning from the time of Ancient Rome; and, afterwards, a synchronic analysis will examine various motifs as they have survived, disappeared or been transformed in the medieval poem. The final part will explore the possible reasons for these changes.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThis article has been written thanks to a stay in the Hardt Foundation of Geneva (Switzerland).es_ES
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfes_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.rightshttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/es_ES
dc.sourceEn: New Medievalisms (eds. Javier Martín-Párraga and Juan de Dios Torralbo-Caballero), p. 269-288.es_ES
dc.subjectGreek Tragedyes_ES
dc.subjectOedipuses_ES
dc.subjectEnglish Literaturees_ES
dc.subjectMedievalismses_ES
dc.subjectTradition of Greek Literaturees_ES
dc.subjectLydgatees_ES
dc.titleEchoes of Greek Tragedy in Medieval Literature: The Case of Oedipuses_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/bookPartes_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record