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dc.contributor.authorPerea-Moreno, Miguel Ángel
dc.contributor.authorManzano Agugliaro, Francisco
dc.contributor.authorHernández-Escobedo, Quetzalcoatl
dc.contributor.authorPerea Moreno, Alberto Jesús
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-05T12:05:04Z
dc.date.available2018-11-05T12:05:04Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10396/17435
dc.description.abstractThe peanut (Arachys hypogaea) is a plant of the Fabaceae family (legumes), as are chickpeas, lentils, beans, and peas. It is originally from South America and is used mainly for culinary purposes, in confectionery products, or as a nut as well as for the production of biscuits, breads, sweets, cereals, and salads. Also, due to its high percentage of fat, peanuts are used for industrialized products such as oils, flours, inks, creams, lipsticks, etc. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) statistical yearbook in 2016, the production of peanuts was 43,982,066 t, produced in 27,660,802 hectares. Peanuts are grown mainly in Asia, with a global production rate of 65.3%, followed by Africa with 26.2%, the Americas with 8.4%, and Oceania with 0.1%. The peanut industry is one of the main generators of agroindustrial waste (shells). This residual biomass (25–30% of the total weight) has a high energy content that is worth exploring. The main objectives of this study are, firstly, to evaluate the energy parameters of peanut shells as a possible solid biofuel applied as an energy source in residential and industrial heating installations. Secondly, different models are analysed to estimate the higher heating value (HHV) for biomass proposed by different scientists and to determine which most accurately fits the determination of this value for peanut shells. Thirdly, we evaluate the reduction in global CO2 emissions that would result from the use of peanut shells as biofuel. The obtained HHV of peanut shells (18.547 MJ/kg) is higher than other biomass sources evaluated, such as olive stones (17.884 MJ/kg) or almond shells (18.200 MJ/kg), and similar to other sources of biomass used at present for home and industrial heating applications. Different prediction models of the HHV value proposed by scientists for different types of biomass have been analysed and the one that best fits the calculation for the peanut shell has been determined. The CO2 reduction that would result from the use of peanut shells as an energy source has been evaluated in all production countries, obtaining values above 0.5h of their total emissions.es_ES
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfes_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherMDPIes_ES
dc.rightshttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/es_ES
dc.sourceSustainability 10(9), 3254 (2018)es_ES
dc.subjectPeanut shelles_ES
dc.subjectBiomasses_ES
dc.subjectCO2es_ES
dc.subjectHigher heating valuees_ES
dc.subjectWastees_ES
dc.subjectGreenhouse gasses emissiones_ES
dc.titlePeanut Shell for Energy: Properties and Its Potential to Respect the Environmentes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3390/su10093254es_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES


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