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dc.contributor.authorAlcántara-de la Cruz, Ricardo
dc.contributor.authorDomínguez Martínez, Pablo Alfredo
dc.contributor.authorMartins da Silveira, Hellen
dc.contributor.authorCruz Hipólito, Hugo E.
dc.contributor.authorPalma-Bautista, Candelario
dc.contributor.authorVázquez-García, José Guadalupe
dc.contributor.authorDomínguez-Valenzuela, José Alfredo
dc.contributor.authorPrado Amián, Rafael dees_ES
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-05T06:53:26Z
dc.date.available2019-09-05T06:53:26Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10396/18971
dc.description.abstractGlyphosate is a cheap herbicide that has been used to control a wide range of weeds (4–6 times/year) in citrus groves of the Gulf of Mexico; however, its excessive use has selected for glyphosate-resistant weeds. We evaluated the efficacy and economic viability of 13 herbicide treatments (glyphosate combined with PRE- and/or POST-emergence herbicides and other alternative treatments), applied in tank-mixture or sequence, to control glyphosate-resistant weeds in two Persian lime groves (referred to as SM-I and SM-II) of the municipality of Acateno, Puebla, during two years (2014 and 2015). The SM-I and SM-II fields had 243 and 346 weeds/m2, respectively, composed mainly of Bidens pilosa and Leptochloa virgata. Echinochloa colona was also frequent in SM-II. The glyphosate alone treatments (1080, 1440, or 1800 g ae ha−1) presented control levels of the total weed population ranging from 64% to 85% at 15, 30, and 45 d after treatment (DAT) in both fields. Mixtures of glyphosate with grass herbicides such as fluazifop-p-butyl, sethoxydim, and clethodim efficiently controlled E. colona and L. virgata, but favored the regrowth of B. pilosa. The sequential applications of glyphosate + (bromacil + diuron) and glufosinate + oxyfluorfen controlled more than 85% the total weed community for more than 75 days. However, these treatments were between 360% and 390% more expensive (1.79 and 1.89 $/day ha−1 of satisfactory weed control, respectively), compared to the representative treatment (glyphosate 1080 g ae ha−1 = USD $29.0 ha−1). In practical and economic terms, glufosinate alone was the best treatment controlling glyphosate resistant weeds maintaining control levels >80% for at least 60 DAT ($1.35/day ha−1). The rest of the treatments, applied in tank-mix or in sequence with glyphosate, had similar or lower control levels (~70%) than glyphosate at 1080 g ae ha−1. The adoption of glufosiante alone, glufosinate + oxyfluorfen or glyphosate + (bromacil + diuron) must consider the cost of satisfactory weed control per day, the period of weed control, as well as other factors associated with production costs to obtain an integrated weed management in the short and long term.es_ES
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfes_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherMDPIes_ES
dc.rightshttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/es_ES
dc.sourcePlants 8(9), 325 (2019)es_ES
dc.subjectCitrus latifoliaes_ES
dc.subjectHairy beggartickses_ES
dc.subjectIntegrated weedmanagementes_ES
dc.subjectJunglericees_ES
dc.subjectTropical sprangletopes_ES
dc.titleManagement of Glyphosate-Resistant Weeds in Mexican Citrus Groves: Chemical Alternatives and Economic Viabilityes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3390/plants8090325es_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES


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