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dc.contributor.authorScalia, Bruno
dc.contributor.authorAlberghina, Daniela
dc.contributor.authorPanzera, Michele
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-01T12:11:18Z
dc.date.available2018-02-01T12:11:18Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn2445-2874
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10396/16051
dc.description.abstractLow stress handling techniques or “Fear Free principles” in veterinary clinics are becoming an important research area aimed at improving small animal welfare, considering that the majority of dogs who undergo clinical examinations exhibit fear or anxiety signs. Objective of this study was to compare a number of physiological and behavioural indicators using low stress handling (LSH) and traditional (TT) techniques in order to assess whether the LSH approach had a positive impact on the dog’s welfare. Eight adult dogs were filmed while undergoing both LSH and TT visits (separated by a distance of seven weeks). The same usual sequence of events was followed for both visits (e. g. muzzle wearing, heart and lungs stethoscope examination, etc.) except that 1) during the LSH visit, the dog was free to explore the environment (while receiving treats) and play for five minutes before and after the visit 2) throughout the medical examination the veterinarians’ attitude and handling techniques were always aimed at preventing stress and guaranteeing the best physical support possible. The videos were then evaluated for the number of fear and stress signs the subjects showed. The examined physiological variables were respiration (breath/min), heart rate (HR) and rectal temperature (RT). Physiological variables were analysed by t-Test for paired data while frequency of behavioural fear indicators by Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Rectal temperature was within range in both groups but significantly higher (P<0.05) during LSH visit, while low head, lip licks and whale eye behaviours were significantly higher (P<0.05) during TT visit. These results suggest that low stress handling decreases frequency of some fear-related behaviours and could improve the quality of human-dog interactions. Future research that aims to replicate and further investigate these results in a large canine population is required.es_ES
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfes_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherUniversidad de Córdoba, Departamento de Medicina y Cirugía Animales_ES
dc.rightshttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/es_ES
dc.sourcePet Behaviour Science 4, 20-22 (2017)es_ES
dc.subjectDogses_ES
dc.subjectLow-stress handlinges_ES
dc.subjectVeterinary hospitales_ES
dc.subjectAnimal welfarees_ES
dc.titleInfluence of low stress handling during clinical visit on physiological and behavioural indicators in adult dogs: a preliminary studyes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://www.uco.es/ucopress/ojs/index.php/pet/indexes_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES


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