Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorFernández Rebollo, Pilar
dc.contributor.advisorGómez Calero, José Alfonso
dc.contributor.authorReyna-Bowen, Lizardo
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-22T09:16:06Z
dc.date.available2021-02-22T09:16:06Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10396/21088
dc.description.abstractSoil is a global resource that has the capacity to contain large amounts of organic carbon. In fact, soils contain more carbon than plants and the atmosphere combined. However, in recent decades human activities such as land-use change, deforestation, biomass burning, and environmental pollution have accelerated the release of terrestrial carbon into the atmosphere, increasing the greenhouse effect. The study of soil organic carbon cycle was recognized in the last decades as a necessary step for controlling future increases in atmospheric CO2, as well as necessary to simultaneously ensure the sustainability agricultural activities. A better comprehension of the he dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) in different agricultural systems will allow an improvement of soil quality and soil organic carbon storage under different climate and soil conditions. However, despite of decade’s long research on this subject, there is still the need for a better appraisal of soil carbon dynamics in specific agricultural systems based on robust in field empirical studies. So, relevant contributions to a better understanding of the impact of land use on the global carbon cycle is of great importance. The present research, framed in the context of a PhD specialization on soil carbon in agricultural areas, is aimed to generate new information on the effect of different factors (climate, land use, management, altitude, and soil type) that influence the sequestration and accumulation of organic carbon along the profile in the soil in different agricultural and forest systems across contrasting edaphoclimatic conditions. This research includes not only new quantitative information on soil organic carbon, but also innovative studies on its distribution among different soil carbon compartments and on the use of near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) on soil organic carbon determination. The first study (Chapter 2) is an analysis of the effect of different agricultural uses in a subtropical climate, in the area of the Carrizal River valley in the province of Manabí Ecuador, based on the analysis of 64 soil profiles. In each profile simples were taken in the soil profile horizons to obtain the concentration of organic carbon up to a maximum depth of 150 cm in different agricultural management (permanent, intensive rotation and abandoned crops), In this study twenty-one different agricultural uses were identified. As expected, the highest concentrations of soil organic carbon happened in the A horizon, which has an average thickness of 40 cm. A trend towards a higher carbon sequestration potential was observed in the grass, intercropping like cocoa with banana and corn area management with an average value of 1.7% C, much higher than the area under mechanized agriculture, which presented lower carbon concentration, with an average value of 0.26% C. Regarding the total soil organic carbon stock, the first horizon accumulated more carbon compared to the other (B and C) soil profiles, with an average value of 41.32±20.97 t C ha−1 and 15.06±15.61 t C ha−1, respectively. The second study (Chapter 3) evaluated the effect of forest management in a temperate climate. For this study, soil samples were taken in a managed environment of forest species (Alnus incana, Fagus sylvatica, Picea abies and Mixed: stands containing beech and spruce) in an elevation range from <900 m a.s.l. to >1100 m a.s.l. from the Babia Góra National Park in southern Poland. Sampling points were taken up to a maximum depth of 100 cm. The results in this study revealed that the SOC reserves in the mountain soils of the Babi Góra National Park are characterized by their great variability (from 50.10 t ha−1 to 905.20 t ha−1). In the conditions of this study, the type of soil is the dominant factor determining soil organic carbon stock, which coupled with topographic factors influence soil and vegetation conditions. This explains such diversity in the accumulation of soil organic carbon in different mountain soils in the areas. The largest carbon stock was recorded in histosols (>550 t C ha−1), which are located in the lower part of the national park. The third block of the research focused on two field studies in one of the most important agroforestry systems across the Mediterranean, dehesa. The first study (Chapter 4) is located in a dehesa in Hinojosa del Duque in Córdoba, Spain: Dehesa is an agro-silvo-pastoral system which combines open land and low density trees (holm oaks). In this first study we investigated two adjacent dehesas on the same soil type but different characteristics. One was a pastureland with young holm oaks (planted in 1995 with a density of 70 trees ha−1 at 12 m x 12 m spacing. The area had been grazed by Merino sheep since 2000, at a grazing rate of 3 sheep per hectare. The second, adjacent area is a cultivated pasture with mature oaks with a minimum age of 90-100 years widely spaced (1.2 trees ha−1). Every three years, a mixture of peas and oats is grown for hay. Tillage is used for the preparation of this seeding except in the immediate vicinity (about 0.3-0.4 m) of the tree trunk. The first dehesa at higher tree density was part of this second dehesa, and so both had the same characteristics until year 1995. Both dehesas were sampled simultaneously in 2017. Sampling points were taken under and outside the canopy projection up to a maximum depth of 100 cm divided into 8 sections (0-2 cm, 2-5 cm, 5-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-40 cm, 40-60 cm, 60-80 cm, and 80- 100 cm). The results showed that a change in dehesa type from an old low density dehesa combining pasture with seeding every 3 years to a one only pastured with increased tree growth (70 trees ha), showed no significant differences in carbon concentration after 22 years’ sicen implanting the more dense dehesa. A clear stratification of carbon was observed in the soil profile, particularly in the top 10 cm of the soil, as well as an effect of the adult tree which resulted in a higher concentration under the tree canopy in the middle soil depth section (20-40 cm) in the mature dehesa. Significant difference in carbon stock was only observed in the top 0-2 cm (5.86±0.56 t ha1 vs 3.24±0.37 t ha1, been higher in the newly planted dehesa. To our knowledge this is the first study evaluating in dehesa the distribution of soil organic carbon into this four (unprotected and physically, chemically and biochemically protected) fractions. Our results showed how most of the carbon in the two dehesas was stored in the unprotected fraction, been its relative contribution higher in the top 0-2 cm o the pastured dehesa and in the below canopy area of the mature trees in the cropped dehesa. This indicates that much of the fraction contained in these soils is particularly vulnerable to hypothetical changes to less sustainable managements. The second study in dehesa (Chapter 5) was located in the municipality of Pozoblanco in the north of the province of Cordoba. In this area three areas of continuous extensive grazing for more than 50 years with cattle, sheep, and pigs were identified, and three areas with different intensity were studied. These areas were: I) Intensive grazing management. II) moderate grazing management and III) no grazing (area excluded for more than 20 years). Sampling points were taken at each of the three areas up to a maximum depth of 30 cm divided into 5 sections (0-2 cm, 2-5 cm, 5-10 cm, 10-20 cm, and 20-30 cm). Concentrations at different grazing intensities showed, as expected, higher carbon concentrations at the surface soil layer (0-2 cm) average of 1.59±0.44%, decreasing to 0.48±0.15% in the deeper section of the soil profile at 20-30 cm. Contradicting our initial hypothesis, no differences in soil organic carbon concentration were detected among the three areas with different grazing intensities, The total carbon stock was analyzed in the whole soil profile (0-30 cm), indicating non significant differences among the two grazed areas, average value of 27 t ha−1, or the area without grazing 26 t ha−1. As in the previous dehesa, the dominant fraction was the unprotected carbon. However, in this case the relative differences in the soil organic carbon concentration between the unprotected fraction and the physically and the chemically protected fractions was larger than in the first dehesa, particularly because the protected fractions tended to show a higher concentration than in the dehesa studied in Chapter 4. Using the empirical results from the study of the second dehesa, we developed a spectral library and predictive equations of concentration of soil organic carbon using Vis-NIR (Chapter 6) from this dataset. The accuracy of the SOC predictive models was very good, with R2 higher than 0.95 and residual predictive deviation (RPD) higher than 4.54, respectively. Refinement of VIS-NIR techniques, such as the one discussed in Chapter 6, could increase our ability to provide more affordable and robust technologies to measure large numbers of samples with the required accuracy, although it is less clear how to address other important sources of variability, such as soil depth, soil type, bulk density, and rock content. To reduce this uncertainty will be of great relevance to continue performing detailed experiments to better quantify on the effect of land use and cropping systems on soil organic carbon content, such as those described in chapters 3, 5 and 5. To date, these experiments are irreplaceable to test specific hypothesis relevant at local level (like the time to increase soil organic carbon stock after planting at higher density, Chapter 4), but also to create a corpus of available data which could improve, or lead to new ones, conceptual or numerical simulation models that can systematize our understanding of the soil organic carbon cycle and eventually reduce the need for large-scale sampling to verify the evolution of soil organic carbon in agricultural systems.es_ES
dc.description.abstractEl suelo es un recurso mundial que tiene la capacidad de contener grandes cantidades de carbono orgánico. De hecho, los suelos contienen más carbono que las plantas y la atmósfera juntas. Sin embargo, en los últimos decenios, las actividades humanas, como el cambio de uso de la tierra, la deforestación, la quema de biomasa y la contaminación ambiental, han acelerado la liberación de carbono terrestre en la atmósfera, aumentando el efecto invernadero. El estudio del ciclo del carbono orgánico del suelo ha sido reconocido en las últimas décadas como un paso necesario para controlar los futuros incrementos del CO2 atmosférico, y también para asegurar la sostenibilidad de la producción agrícola. Una mejor comprensión de la dinámica del carbono orgánico del suelo (SOC) en los diferentes sistemas agrícolas permitirá mejorar la calidad del suelo y el almacenamiento de carbono orgánico del suelo en diferentes condiciones edafoclimáticas. Sin embargo, a pesar de décadas de investigaciones sobre este asunto, sigue siendo necesaria una mejor evaluación de la din´[a]mica del carbono del suelo en sistemas agrícolas específicos, basada en estudios empíricos de campo sólidos. Una mejor comprensión del impacto del uso de la tierra en el ciclo mundial del carbono es de gran relevancia. La presente investigación, enmarcada en el contexto de una especialización de doctorado sobre el carbono del suelo en las zonas agrícolas, tiene por objeto generar nueva información sobre el efecto de los diferentes factores (clima, uso de la tierra, ordenación, altitud y tipo de suelo) que influyen en el secuestro y la acumulación de carbono orgánico a lo largo del perfil en el suelo en diferentes sistemas agrícolas y forestales condiciones edafoclimáticas muy diversas. Esta investigación incluye no sólo nueva información cuantitativa sobre el carbono orgánico del suelo, sino también estudios innovadores sobre su distribución entre diferentes compartimentos y sobre el uso de la espectroscopia del infrarrojo cercano (NIR) en la determinación del carbono orgánico del suelo. El primer estudio (Capítulo 2) es un análisis del efecto de los diferentes usos agrícolas en un clima subtropical, en la zona del valle del río Carrizal en la provincia de Manabí, Ecuador basado en el análisis de 64 perfiles de suelo. En cada perfil se tomaron muestras en los horizontes de los perfiles de suelo para obtener la concentración de carbono orgánico hasta una profundidad máxima de 150 cm en diferentes manejos agrícolas (permanentes, rotación intensiva y cultivos abandonados). En esta zona se identificaron veintiún usos agrícolas diferentes. Como era de esperar, las mayores concentraciones de carbono orgánico en el suelo se produjeron en el horizonte A, que tiene un espesor medio de 40 cm. Se observó una tendencia hacia un mayor potencial de secuestro de carbono en zonas pastos, cultivo intercalado como cacao con plátano y maíz con un valor promedio de 1.7% C, mucho mayor que las zonas de agricultura mecanizada que presentó una menor concentración de carbono con un valor promedio de 0. 26% C. El contenido total de carbono, el primer horizonte (A) fue mucho mayor en comparación con los otros perfiles de suelo (B y C), con un valor medio de 41,32±20,97 t C ha1 y 15,06±15,61 t C ha1, respectivamente. El segundo estudio (Capítulo 3) evaluó el efecto de la ordenación forestal en un clima templado. Para ello, se tomaron muestras de suelo en un entorno de gestión de especies forestales (Alnus incana, Fagus sylvatica, Picea abies, y Mixto: rodales que contienen hayas y abetos) en un rango de elevación de <900 m s.n.m. a >1100 m s.n.m. del Parque Nacional de Babia Góra en el sur de Polonia. El suelo se muestreó hasta una profundidad máxima de 100 cm. Los resultados de este estudio en Polonia revelaron que las reservas SOC en los suelos de montaña del Parque Nacional de Babi Góra se caracterizan por su gran variabilidad (de 50,10 t ha1 a 905,20 t ha1). En las condiciones de este estudio, el tipo de suelo es fue el factor dominante que determina el contenido total de carbono orgánico del suelo, que junto con los factores topográficos determina las condiciones del suelo y la vegetación. Esto explica tal diversidad en la acumulación de carbono orgánico del suelo en diferentes suelos de montaña en las zonas La mayor reserva de carbono se registró en los histosoles (>550 t C ha1), que están situados en la parte baja del parque nacional. El tercer bloque de la investigación se centró en dos estudios de campo en uno de los sistemas agroforestales más importantes del Mediterráneo, la dehesa. El primer estudio (Capítulo 4), se investigó una dehesa en Hinojosa del Duque en Córdoba, España: La dehesa es un sistema agro-silvo-pastoril que combina zona de cultivo y/o pastoreo con árboles a baja densidad (encinas). En este estudio localizamos dos dehesas adyacentes en el mismo tipo de suelo pero de características diferentes. Una era una dehesa con encinas jóvenes (plantadas en 1995 con una densidad de 70 árboles ha1 a 12 m x 12 m de distancia. La zona había sido pastoreada por ovejas merinas desde el año 2000, a una tasa de pastoreo de 3 ovejas por hectárea. La segunda zona, adyacente a la primera, es un pastizal cultivado con robles maduros con una edad mínima de 90-100 años ampliamente espaciados (1,2 árboles ha1). Cada tres años se cultiva una mezcla de guisantes y avena para el heno. La parcela se labra para la preparación del terreno para siembra excepto el suelo en las inmediaciones (alrededor de 0,3-0,4 m) del tronco del árbol. La primera dehesa con mayor densidad de árboles formaba parte de esta segunda dehesa, por lo que ambas tuvieron las mismas características hasta el año 1995. Ambas dehesas fueron muestreadas simultáneamente en 2017. Los puntos de muestreo se tomaron bajo y fuera del dosel vegetal hasta una profundidad máxima de 100 cm divididos en 8 secciones (0-2 cm, 2-5 cm, 5-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-40 cm, 40-60 cm, 60-80 cm y 80- 100 cm). Los resultados mostraron que un cambio en el tipo de dehesa de una antigua dehesa de baja densidad que combinaba el pastoreo con la siembra cada 3 años a una dehesa única con un mayor crecimiento de los árboles (70 árboles ha), no resultó en diferencias significativas en la concentración de carbono después de 22 años de pecado implantando la dehesa más densa. Se observó una clara estratificación del carbono en el perfil del suelo, en particular en los 10 cm superiores del suelo, así como un efecto del árbol adulto que dio lugar a una mayor concentración de carbono bajo el dosel de los árboles en la profundidad intermedia (20-40 cm) en la dehesa madura. Sólo se observó una diferencia significativa en la reserva de carbono en los 0-2 cm superiores (5,86±0,56 t ha1 vs 3,24±0,37 t ha1, siendo mayor en la dehesa recién plantada. Hasta donde sabemos, este es el primer estudio que ha evaluado en dehesa la distribución del carbono orgánico del suelo estas cuatro fracciones (desprotegida, física, química y bioquímicamente protegidas). Nuestros resultados mostraron cómo la mayor parte del carbono en las dos dehesas se almacenaba en la fracción no protegida, siendo su relevancia relativa particularmente alta en la profundidad superior de 0-2 cm de la dehesa sólo pastoreada y en la zona de la copa de los árboles maduros en la dehesa cultivada. Esto indica que gran parte de la fracción contenida en estos suelos es particularmente vulnerable a hipotéticos futuros cambios en los manejos menos sostenibles. El segundo estudio en dehesa (Capítulo 5) se efectuó en el municipio de Pozoblanco, al norte de la provincia de Córdoba. En esta zona se identificó una dehesa que de manera continuada se ha pastoreada desde hace más de 50 años de manera extensiva extensivo con ganado vacuno, ovino y porcino. En la misma se delimitaron tres zonas con diferente densidad de pastoreo. Estas zonas fueron:. I) Manejo de pastos intensivos. II) Manejo moderado del pastoreo y III) no pastoreo (área excluida durante más de 20 años). Se tomaron puntos de muestreo en cada zona hasta una profundidad máxima de 30 cm divididos en 5 secciones (0-2 cm, 2-5 cm, 5-10 cm, 10-20 cm y 20-30 cm). Los resultados mostraron, como era de esperar, mayores concentraciones de carbono en la superficie (0-2 cm) 1,59±0,44% disminuyendo a 0,48±0,15% en la última sección del perfil del suelo a 20-30 cm. Contra nuestra hipótesis de partida no se detectaron diferencias en concentración de carbono en el suelo entre las tres zonas. Se analizó la cantidad total de carbono en todo el perfil del suelo (0-30 cm), indicando diferencias no significativas entre las dos áreas de pastoreo, valor promedio de 27 t ha1, o el área sin pastoreo 26 t ha1. Al igual que en la dehesa estudiada en el Capítulo 4, la fracción dominante fue el carbono no protegido. Sin embargo, en este caso las diferencias relativas en la concentración de carbono orgánico del suelo entre la fracción no protegida y las fracciones física y químicamente protegidas fue mayor que en la primera dehesa, particularmente debido a que las fracciones protegidas tendían a mostrar una mayor concentración de carbono orgánico que en la dehesa estudiada anteriormente en el Capítulo 4. Utilizando los resultados experimentales de este último estudio„ desarrollamos una biblioteca espectral y para desarrollar ecuaciones predictivas de concentración de carbono orgánico utilizando Vis-NIR (Capítulo 6) para este set de datos. La precisión de los modelos SOC fue muy buena, con R2 mayor de 0.95 y la desviación predictiva residual (RPD) superior a 4,54. El perfeccionamiento de las técnicas Vis-NIR, como la que se analiza en el Capítulo 6, podría aumentar nuestra capacidad de proporcionar tecnologías más asequibles y robustas para medir un gran número de muestras con la precisión necesaria, aunque no resulta claro cómo abordar otras fuentes importantes de variabilidad, como son la profundidad del perfil y el tipo de suelo, la densidad aparente y el contenido de material grueso superior a 2mm. Para reducir esta incertidumbre será de gran relevancia continuar realizando experimentos bien diseñados para cuantificar mejor el efecto del uso de la tierra y los sistemas de cultivo en el contenido de carbono orgánico del suelo, como los descritos en los capítulos 3, 4 y 5. Estos experimentos son irreemplazables para validar hipótesis relevantes a nivel local (como el momento de aumentar las reservas de carbono orgánico del suelo después de la plantación a una mayor densidad, Capítulo 4), pero también para crear un corpus de información disponible que podría mejorar, o conducir a nuevos, modelos de simulación conceptual o numérica que pueden sistematizar nuestra comprensión del ciclo del carbono orgánico del suelo y eventualmente reducir la necesidad de muestreo a gran escala para verificar la evolución del carbono orgánico del suelo en los sistemas agrícolas.es_ES
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfes_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherUniversidad de Córdoba, UCOPresses_ES
dc.rightshttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/es_ES
dc.subjectOrganic carbones_ES
dc.subjectSoil organic carbones_ES
dc.subjectAgricultural systemses_ES
dc.subjectForest systemses_ES
dc.subjectLand-usees_ES
dc.subjectAgroforestryes_ES
dc.titleOrganic carbon in agricultural and agroforestry soils: Effect of different management practiceses_ES
dc.title.alternativeCarbono orgánico en suelos agrícolas y agroforestales: Efecto de las diferentes prácticas de gestiónes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/doctoralThesises_ES
dc.relation.projectIDJunta de Andalucía. AGR-0931
dc.relation.projectIDGobierno de España.RTA2014-00063- C04-03
dc.relation.projectIDinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020/773903 (SHui)
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record