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dc.contributor.authorClark, Stephanie D.
dc.contributor.authorSmidt, Jessica M.
dc.contributor.authorBauer, Brent A.
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-15T13:02:03Z
dc.date.available2019-02-15T13:02:03Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn2445-2874
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10396/17867
dc.description.abstractInteraction with a therapy dog can decrease blood pressure, heart rate, and improve heart rate variability; due to these responses, it suggests that human-animal interaction can alleviate the stress response. This study aims to observe if the effects of therapy dog visits could alleviate nursing burnout and increase work satisfaction in an outpatient setting. In addition, this study will observe at what visit frequency of therapy dog visits nurses benefited from most. This study is a two-part study, which also observed the salivary cortisol concentrations of the therapy dogs post therapy visit interaction. The study design was a controlled before-after study design with five treatments over the course of six months, each treatment (TRT) lasting four weeks: TRT A, two therapy dog visits a week; TRT B, one visit a week; TRT C, two visits; TRT D, one visit; and TRT E, no visits. Four out-patient nursing units were selected and asked to complete a demographic survey, the Pet Attitude Scale-Modified, and Lexington Attachment to Pet Scale. Pre- and post-treatments, participants completed the Human Services Survey, Nursing Workplace Satisfaction Questionnaire, Nursing Work Index (Revised), and a visual analog scale. TRT A was able to significantly increase the feeling of happiness. In addition TRT B, a therapy dog visit once a week, was able to significantly reduce self-reported responses of depression and improve emotional wellbeing. Consequently, TRT E, control/no therapy dog visits, had the least amount of improvement in the nursing units’ visual analog scale. This study supports the hypothesis that therapy dog visits can help alleviate stress, frustration, feeling drained, and the overwhelming sensation that can come from working in the nursing field.es_ES
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfes_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherUniversidad de Córdoba, Departamento de Medicina y Cirugía Animales_ES
dc.rightshttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/es_ES
dc.sourcePet Behaviour Science 6, 8-15 (2018)es_ES
dc.subjectBurnoutes_ES
dc.subjectCompassion fatiguees_ES
dc.subjectTherapy dogses_ES
dc.subjectWelfarees_ES
dc.titleImpact of therapy dog visits on outpatient nurse welfare and job satisfactiones_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://www.uco.es/ucopress/ojs/index.php/pet/indexes_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES


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