Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBarro Losada, Francisco
dc.contributor.authorSánchez León, Susana
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-04T09:50:46Z
dc.date.available2020-02-04T09:50:46Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10396/19461
dc.description.abstractWorld agricultural production is dominated by three cereal crops; wheat, maize and rice, of which wheat is the most widely distributed, with an annual production of more than 771 million tonnes, only below that of maize. Its wide distribution and use are due to its adaptability to different environments, high yield, and versatility for the food industry where it is used in a wide variety of daily foodstuff such as bread, pasta, cakes, noodles, biscuits, etc. Wheat is also a relevant nutritional source of complex carbohydrates, protein, and dietary fiber, as well as minerals, vitamins and phytoactive compounds, and its consumption is more widespread than that of barley or rye. Gluten, which is also present in other Triticeae species including barley and rye, comprise about 80% of the total wheat grain protein and provides wheat flour with unique technological and biomechanical properties responsible for the bread-making quality of wheat flour. However, gluten is not a single protein, but a complex mixture that include monomeric gliadins (α-, ω- and γ-gliadins) and glutenins (HMW and LMW), which provide, respectively, wheat dough with viscosity and elasticity. The non-gluten proteins (NGP) constitute about the 20% of the total grain protein content and include a wide range of proteins with metabolic and structural functions that plays a secondary role in wheat quality. Within NGP are included various groups of proteins such as α-amylase/trypsin inhibitors (also knowns as ATIs), serine protease inhibitor (serpins), Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs), β-amylase, etc. Gluten proteins are also responsible of triggering certain pathologies. Gluten-related allergies and intolerances include celiac disease (CD), non-celiac wheat/gluten sensitivity (NCGS) and wheat allergies. CD is usually defined as an autoimmune enteropathy caused by dietary gluten intake in genetically predisposed persons affecting about 1% of western countries population. In contrast, NCGS is not well understood, with symptoms overlapping with those of CD and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Prevalence of NCGS is difficult of assess as, in contrast to CD, there is not reliable immunogenic, genetics, or molecular biomarkers, and diagnosis is made by exclusion of other pathologies. It is not clear whether the causal agent of NCGS is gluten; recent studies report that FODMAPs (fermentable oligosaccharides, monosaccharides and disaccharides and polyols) and non-gluten components of wheat such as ATIs seems to activate the innate immune system , and therefore they were proposed to have a role in the NCGS. In the case of CD, there is a vast knowledge about the gluten epitopes that are recognized by HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 molecules present in predisposed individuals. Gluten peptide recognition by HLA-DQ2/8 molecules stimulates T-cells response which ultimately induces crypt hyperplasia and intestinal villus damage along with several derived complications. Although several CD epitopes are found in the glutenin fraction of gluten, the majority of the immunogenic CD epitopes are found in the gliadin fraction of gluten. Among gliadins, α-gliadins have the strongest immunogenicity. They contain the 33-mer, which is known to be the main immunodominant peptide for CD as it contains six overlapping copies of three different DQ2-restricted T-cell epitopes with highly stimulatory properties . A lifelong strict gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only available treatment for CD. In the case of NCGS many patients follow a GFD, although there is evidence that they may have different levels of tolerance. However, a GFD is difficult to follow, socially inconvenient, expensive and tends to be less healthy as they tend to be poorer in several important dietary components with involvement of high amounts of fat and sugar to mimic the viscoelastic properties of gluten. In addition, the GFD may also have negative effects on beneficial gut microbiota. Given this situation, the development of cereal varieties devoiding of immunogenic epitopes should be considered. Unfortunately, this is almost impossible to achieve through traditional plant breeding due to the high number and complexity of the genes encoding for gluten proteins. Instead, several strategies can be deployed towards this goal, which include: i) the search of varieties that naturally lack of CD epitopes, ii) the development of new cereals with low immunogenic profile and iii) the application of biotechnological technologies to overcome traditional breeding limitations. Tritordeum is a new cereal derived from the cross between a species of wild barley and durum wheat, which differs from bread wheat in its gluten composition, particularly with respect to gliadin. The reason is the fact that durum wheat lacks the D genome, where the most important epitopes in relation to celiac disease are located, and that barley varieties also contain very few immunogenic peptides compared to wheat, making tritordeum a good candidate as cereal with low levels of gluten immunogenic peptides. Despite all efforts, no varieties of wheat that naturally lack immunogenic epitopes have been identified so far. The development of biotechnological techniques, such as genetic transformation and interference RNA (RNAi), allowed gene silencing of specific gliadin fractions and all gliadins present in wheat grains where most of relevant epitopes for CD and other gluten pathologies are located. Some of these RNAi lines showed a reduction in their stimulation capacity of T-cell clones, thus showing absence of reactivity and the possibility of manufacturing food for celiac disease patients. However, the silencing of gliadins caused a compensatory effect with other protein fractions, increasing the content of NGP, which is particularly important as proteins belonging to this group, such as ATIs, β- amylase and serpins, have been related to wheat allergens. On the other hand, in the last decade genetic engineering has expanded its toolbox by incorporating gene editing by the use of sequence-specific nucleases (SSN). CRISPR/Cas9 technology allows precise changes at specific points of interest in the genome. Although it has become one of the most powerful tools for gene editing in plants, examples describing breeding of important traits in crops with complex, polyploid genomes are still limited. The general objective of this work is the identification and development of healthier and suitable cereals for people suffering from allergies and intolerances. Potential benefits of its development are the improvement of the organoleptic and nutritional profile of foods for CD and NCGS patients, as well as for general population that for whatever reason aims to reduce their gluten intake. With this purpose we characterized of new cereal varieties with reduced immunogenic profile and applied gene editing technologies (CRISPR/Cas9) to target the most immunodominant complex related to CD in wheat.es_ES
dc.description.abstractLa producción agrícola mundial está dominada por tres cultivos de cereales: el trigo, el maíz y el arroz, de los cuales el trigo es el más ampliamente distribuido. La producción anual de trigo supera los 771 millones de toneladas (FAOSTAT, 2017), hallándose únicamente por debajo de la del maíz. Su amplia distribución y uso se debe a su gran adaptabilidad a diferentes entornos, su alto rendimiento, y a su versatilidad para la industria alimentaria, en la que se emplea para la fabricación de una gran variedad de alimentos de uso diario como pan, pastas, pasteles, fideos, galletas, etc. El trigo es también una fuente nutricional importante de carbohidratos complejos, proteínas y fibra dietética, así como de minerales, vitaminas y compuestos fitoactivos. El gluten, también presente en otras especies de la tribu Triticeae como la cebada y el centeno, representa alrededor del 80% de la proteína total del grano de trigo y confiere unas propiedades tecnológicas y biomecánicas únicas a la harina de trigo, las cuales son responsables de la calidad harino-panadera del trigo harinero. Sin embargo, el gluten no es una única proteína, sino una mezcla compleja de ellas, donde se incluyen las gliadinas (α-, ω- y γ-gliadinas), monoméricas, y gluteninas (HMW y LMW), poliméricas, que proporcionan viscosidad y elasticidad a la masa de trigo respectivamente. Las proteínas no pertenecientes al gluten (NGP) constituyen alrededor del 20% del contenido total de la proteína del grano e incluyen una amplia gama de proteínas con funciones metabólicas y estructurales que juegan un papel secundario en la calidad del trigo. Dentro de las NGP se incluyen varios grupos de proteínas como α-amilasa/tripsina inhibidores (también conocidos como ATIs), inhibidor de serina proteasa (serpinas), proteínas de transferencia de lípidos (LTPs), β- amilasas, etc. Las proteínas del gluten también son responsables de desencadenar ciertas patologías. Las alergias e intolerancias relacionadas con el gluten incluyen la enfermedad celiaca (EC), la sensibilidad no celiaca al gluten/trigo (NCGS) y las alergias al trigo. La EC se define como una enteropatía autoinmune causada por la ingesta de gluten que se da en personas genéticamente predispuestas, afectando aproximadamente al 1% de la población de los países occidentales. Por el contrario, la NCGS no está bien definida, con síntomas que se superponen con los del EC y el síndrome del intestino irritable (SII). La prevalencia de la NCGS es difícil establecer debido a la falta de biomarcadores, realizándose su diagnostico mediante la exclusión de otras patologías. No está totalmente claro si el agente causal de la NCGS es el gluten; estudios recientes han demostrado que los Formas (oligosacáridos, monosacáridos, disacáridos y polioles fermentables) y algunas NGP del trigo, como los ATIs, parecen activar el sistema inmunitario innato y, por lo tanto, desempeñan cierto papel en la NCGS. En el caso de la EC, existe un amplio conocimiento sobre los epítopos del gluten reconocidos por las moléculas HLA-DQ2 y HLA-DQ8 presentes en los individuos genéticamente predispuestos. El reconocimiento de ciertos péptidos por las moléculas HLA DQ2/8 estimula la respuesta de las células-T, lo que en última instancia induce a una hiperplasia de las criptas y danos en las vellosidades intestinales además de varias complicaciones derivadas. Aunque existen epítopos de la EC en la fracción de las gluteninas, la inmensa mayoría se encuentran en la fracción de las gliadinas, particularmente en las α- gliadinas que son las más inmunogénicas. En ellas se encuentra el 33-mer, conocido por ser el mayor complejo inmunogénico de la EC ya que contiene seis copias superpuestas de tres epítopos con propiedades altamente estimulatorias. Actualmente el único tratamiento para la EC es una estricta dieta sin gluten (DSG) mantenida de por vida. Aunque la DSG es también recomendada para los pacientes con NCGS, existen evidencias de que puede haber distintos niveles de tolerancia para esos pacientes. Una DSG es difícil de seguir, socialmente inconveniente, costosa económicamente y además tiende a ser menos saludable, ya que es carece de varios componentes nutricionales importantes además de contener mayores cantidades de grasas y azúcares con el objeto de imitar las propiedades viscoelásticas del gluten. Del mismo modo, la DSG también se asocia a efectos negativos sobre el microbioma intestinal beneficioso. El desarrollo de cereales desprovistos de epítopos inmunogénicos es una posibilidad muy atractiva. Desafortunadamente este objetivo es casi imposible de alcanzar mediante mejora genética vegetal clásica, debido al alto número de copias de los genes que codifican para las proteínas del gluten y su elevada complejidad. En cualquier caso, diversas estrategias pueden aplicarse para la consecución de este objetivo, entre las que se incluyen: i) la búsqueda de variedades que de manera natural carezcan de epítopos de la EC y otros alergenos, ii) el desarrollo de nuevos cereales con bajo perfil inmunogénico y iii) la aplicación de técnicas biotecnológicas para superar las limitaciones de la mejora clásica. El tritordeum es un nuevo cereal derivado del cruce entre una especie de cebada silvestre y un trigo duro, que difiere del trigo harinero en la composición del gluten, especialmente en lo que respecta a las gliadinas. Esto se debe a que el trigo duro carece del genoma D, donde se localizan los epítopos más importantes en relación con la enfermedad celiaca, y a que las variedades de cebada también contienen muy pocos péptidos inmunogénicos en comparación con el trigo, lo que convierte al tritordeum en un buen candidato como cereal con bajos niveles de péptidos inmunogénicos. A pesar de todos los esfuerzos, hasta el momento no se han identificado variedades de trigo que carezcan naturalmente de epítopos inmunogénicos. El desarrollo de la biotecnología, con técnicas como la transformación genética y el ARN de interferencia (ARNi), ha permitido silenciar los genes de fracciones específicas de gliadinas, además de los de todas las gliadinas, presentes en el grano de trigo. Algunas de las líneas de trigo ARNi mostraron una reducción en su capacidad estimulatoria de líneas de células-T específicas para la EC, mostrando así una ausencia de reactividad y la posibilidad ser empleadas en la fabricación de alimentos para pacientes celiacos. Sin embargo, el silenciamiento de las gliadinas provoco un efecto compensatorio con otras fracciones proteicas, aumentando el contenido de NGP. Esto último es particularmente importante debido a que determinadas proteínas pertenecientes a este grupo, como los ATIs, β-amilasas y serpinas, se han relacionado con los alergenos del trigo. A lo largo de la última década el abanico de herramientas para la ingeniería genética se ha visto ampliado gracias a la incorporación de técnicas de edición de genes a través de nucleasas específicas de secuencia (SSN). Estas técnicas, entre las que se incluye CRISPR/Cas9, permiten cambios muy precisos en el genoma y se han convertido en una de las herramientas más poderosas para la edición de genes en las plantas. Sin embargo, los ejemplos de edición de caracteres importantes en cultivos con genomas poliploides complejos son todavía muy limitados. El objetivo general de este trabajo es la identificación y el desarrollo de cereales mas saludables y que puedan ser aptos para las personas que sufren de alergias e intolerancias. Estos cereales tendrían indudables beneficios como la mejora del perfil organoléptico y nutricional de los alimentos para los pacientes con EC y NCGS, así como para la población en general que por cualquier motivo pretenda reducir la ingesta de gluten. Con este propósito hemos abordado la identificación y caracterización de nuevas variedades de cereales con perfil inmunogénico reducido y hemos aplicado las tecnologías de edición genética (CRISPR/Cas9) para editar el mayor complejo inmunogénico relacionado con la enfermedad celiaca.es_ES
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfes_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherUniversidad de Córdoba, UCOPresses_ES
dc.rightshttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/es_ES
dc.subjectWheates_ES
dc.subjectGlutenes_ES
dc.subjectCeliac diseasees_ES
dc.subjectIntoleranceses_ES
dc.subjectMutagenesises_ES
dc.subjectNucleaseses_ES
dc.subjectCRISPR/Cas9es_ES
dc.subjectTritordeumes_ES
dc.subjectImmunogenic peptideses_ES
dc.titleIdentification and Development of Cereals Suitable for People suffering from Gluten Allergies and Intolerances: Directed Mutagenesis by Specific Nucleases (CRISPR/Cas9) of Immunodominant Genes in Relation to Celiac Diseasees_ES
dc.title.alternativeIdentificación y Desarrollo de Cereales Aptos para Personas con Alergias e Intolerancia al Gluten: Mutagénesis Dirigida mediante Nucleasas Específicas (CRISPR/Cas9) de Genes Inmunodominantes en Relación a la Celiaquíaes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/doctoralThesises_ES
dc.relation.projectIDGobierno de España. AGL2013-48946-C3-1-Res_ES
dc.relation.projectIDGobierno de España. AGL2016-80566-Pes_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record